Loading map...

Loading

Trackers

Police Stations

City or Town

Language

Search


Ngarigu

The Ngarigu (also Ngarigo) language was spoken on the Monaro Plains in southern NSW at places such as Delegate, Bombala and Jindabyne.  It is closely related to languages spoken in the Canberra district and others on the south coast of NSW.  Some surviving speakers settled on the Aboriginal Reserve at Delegate in the late 19th century before moving to the south coast of NSW and Gippsland, Victoria, in the late 1920s as the Aborigines Protection Board increased their level of control over Aboriginal people.  Prominent Ngarigu trackers include William Rutherford and Alexander Brindle who worked at stations including Bombala, Delegate and Dalgety.[1]Jim Wafer & Amanda Lissarrague A Handbook of Aboriginal Languages of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory 2008, Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative, Nambucca Heads; Michael Young The Aboriginal People of the Monaro – A Documentary History, second edition, 2005, Department of Environment and Conservation, NSW.

References   [ + ]

1. Jim Wafer & Amanda Lissarrague A Handbook of Aboriginal Languages of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory 2008, Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative, Nambucca Heads; Michael Young The Aboriginal People of the Monaro – A Documentary History, second edition, 2005, Department of Environment and Conservation, NSW.

NSW Aboriginal Trackers

This website explores the history of Aboriginal trackers in NSW from 1862 when the current NSW Police Force was established through to 1973 when the last tracker, Norman Walford, retired.  You can read about the lives of individual trackers and some of the incredible tracking feats they performed.  There is also information about the police stations where they worked and...

Learn More

Police Stations

There were over 200 NSW police stations that employed Aboriginal trackers between 1862 and 1973.  Many were concentrated in the central-west and north-west of the state, the agricultural and pastoral heartland of NSW.  This is because one of the main jobs of trackers was to pursue sheep, cattle and horse thieves. Trackers sometimes lived in small huts out the back...

Learn More

A General History

Early History Since the beginning of the colony, government agencies, explorers, surveyors and members of the general public called upon the tracking abilities of Aboriginal men and women.  First Fleet officers and early land-owners sometimes made use of Aboriginal men to track and capture escaped convicts.  Alexander Berry, for example, relied on an Aboriginal man known as Broughton (or Toodwick)...

Learn More